The Merits of Active Commuting

10703435_10152703071030042_1436081520_oIn 2008, when I lived in Calgary and often drove five blocks to a convenience or grocery store, I wrote an article about active commuting. Most articles I write don’t change the way I think and live, but this particular article made me a zealous convert to an active commuting lifestyle.

“Fit to Ride: Active Commuters Reduce Environmental Footprint, Save Money, and Improve Fitness,” appeared in the September/October 2008 issue of Impact Magazine. As a part of my research, I interviewed a well-respected author and journalist, Gordon Jaremko, about his commitment to active commuting. What he said about active commuting, cycling in particular, resonated with me. “It’s just a fun, addictive way to get around that makes you know your community better, from its topography to its weather, wildlife, sights, sounds, and smells. A one- to two-hour bicycle commute is the complete opposite of spending time in a car. In a car, it’s expensive, dead, boring, and frustrating time,” Gordon said.

I instantly and completely subscribed to his view of active commuting. Since that day, active commuting has been my ideal, although I do fall short occasionally. When I moved back to Winnipeg from Calgary in late August 2009, I left my car behind. I dusted off my bike, got a good pair of walking shoes and began using my body to get around Winnipeg. I made a decision to live just outside the city’s core so I could active commute to my downtown job. Because I live near the chronically bottlenecked Osborne Street, cycling to work gets me there faster than driving. It also prevents me from starting my day in a road rage. I am not a morning person and I cannot think of anything worse than being stuck in traffic on my way to work.

Cycling is my favourite way to active commute, but many people walk, take public transit, roller blade or even run to work. When I use my body to get to work, I arrive feeling positive, alert and focused. Everybody knows that exercise keeps the body healthy, but it also keeps the mind healthy by reducing stress and activating neurotransmitters that help people focus.

Now I am not going to lie: committing to a lifestyle of active commuting ain’t easy. I walk around with baby wipes to clean myself up after a ride on a hot day or freshen up at my gym before work. I have business-attire wardrobe in my office. When I grocery shop, I do find it cumbersome to carry 30 pounds of groceries home from my local grocery store, but I do burn about 150 calories on the trek back.

Right now, I am a single, childless free spirit. I probably could not maintain this lifestyle if I had kids. Kids have lessons or need to be dropped off at birthday parties. Some of my friends who have children still make an effort though. For instance, a good friend in Calgary drops her son off, leaves her vehicle at one of the designated parking spots and then takes the CTrain the rest of the way to work. There are so many variations on active commuting and just about everyone can make something work.

Hopping on my bike in the morning, feeling the sunshine on my face (protected by SPF 60 of course), seeing people walk their dogs, hearing crows negotiate plans with their caws, and smelling freshly baked bread as I ride past the Fort Garry Hotel makes my soul sing. I just wouldn’t have that experience in a car.

What’s good for the mind and body is also good for the environment. By choosing to cycle to work, I am helping to improve our air quality and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. I am burning calories instead of fossil fuels. As a curvy endomorph-mesomorph hybrid, burning calories and building muscles is my only hope of staying compact and sprightly.

Now, it’s quite easy to tout the benefits of active commuting when the weather is beautiful. Come January, when the temperature plummets to -30oC, I know I will want to buy a car. But once again, I will look to Gordon Jaremko for inspiration. Legend has it that he tested out a new winter jacket during a work trip to Fort McMurray by walking to the airport with a temperature of -40oC. If Gordon can do it, I can do it. I love winter cycling, but it’s too dangerous in rush hour. Walking will be my active commute of choice in the winter. Stay tuned for reports about frosty, invigorating walks.